Using a mixed method approach to discuss the intersectionalities of class, education, and gender in natural disasters for rural vulnerable communities in Pakistan

Hassan Raza

Abstract


During the floods of 2014, Pakistan lost 267 human lives. 2.5 million people were displaced, 129,880 houses were fully or partially destroyed, and over 1 million acres of cropland and 250,000 farmers were affected, which resulted in the loss of cash crops and standing food. Using Intersectionality Theory, the current study examines the effects of income, education, land ownership, land type, disaster type, gender, and disability on the loss of agricultural crops, controlling for respondents’ age. Secondary data was used for this study from a 2012 baseline survey of disaster risk reduction, conducted by a nongovernment organization in District Muzaffargarh, Punjab, Pakistan. Logistic regression was used to analyze the data. Results indicated that education of household head, high income, and land ownership decreased the likelihood of losing agricultural crops, whereas floods, women-headed households, and disabled family members increased the likelihood of losing agricultural crops.

Keywords: intersectionality; natural disasters; rural vulnerable communities

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